Rewriting forest history in West Africa | Land Portal

Resource information

Date of publication: 
January 2002
Resource Language: 
ISBN / Resource ID: 
eldis:A8724

Kissidougou in Guinea, West Africa, is characterised by so-called 'forest islands', relics - it was assumed -of original dense forest cover. It was also assumed that local cultivation practice was to blame for the destruction of the trees. However, as collaborative research led by the School of Oriental and African Studies, the Institute of Development Studies and Guinean researchers discovered, villagers had a different story to tell: that the forest islands had in fact been established over several generations as part of a process of deliberate forest management. Archives and air-photographs backed the villagers' perspective and investigation of land-use practices showed how landscapes were being enriched.

Authors and Publishers

Author(s), editor(s), contributor(s): 

James Fairhead
Melissa Leach

Publisher(s): 

Aims to make policymakers and on-the-ground development managers aware of the latest and best in British development research findings. Offers policy-relevant findings on critical global development issues, drawn from over 40 major UK-based economics and social studies departments and think-tanks, together with a wide range of NGO research departments and consultants.

Service is divided into sectors:

Data provider

eldis (ELDIS)

Eldis is an online information service providing free access to relevant, up-to-date and diverse research on international development issues. The database includes over 40,000 summaries and provides free links to full-text research and policy documents from over 8,000 publishers. Each document is selected by members of our editorial team.

Share this page