Center for International Forestry Research | Land Portal
Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)
Acronym: 
CIFOR
Focal point: 
cifor@cgiar.org

The Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) is a non-profit, scientific facility that conducts research on the most pressing challenges of forest and landscapes management around the world. With our global, multidisciplinary approach, we aim to improve human well-being, protect the environment, and increase equity. To do so, we help policymakers, practitioners and communities make decisions based on solid science about how they use and manage their forests and landscapes.

Capacity building, collaboration and partnerships are essential to finding and implementing innovative solutions to the challenges that the globe faces. We are proud to work with local and international partners. We are a member of the CGIAR Consortium and lead the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

Our headquarters are in Bogor, Indonesia. We have offices in 8 countries across Asia, Latin America and Africa, and we work in more than 30 countries. Contact us for more information.

Center for International Forestry Research Resources

Displaying 1 - 10 of 760
Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
March, 2021
Global

This practitioner’s guide explains how to promote gender-responsive forest tenure reform in community-based forest regimes. It is aimed at those taking up this challenge in developing countries. There is no one single approach to reforming forest tenure practices for achieving gender equality and women’s empowerment. Rather, it involves taking advantage of opportunities that emerge in various institutional arenas such as policy and law-making and implementation, government administration, customary or community-based tenure governance, or forest restoration at the landscape scale.

Library Resource
Forest tenure pathways to gender equality: A practitioner’s guide
Reports & Research
January, 2021
Global

This practitioner’s guide explains how to promote gender-responsive forest tenure reform in community-based forest regimes. It is aimed at those taking up this challenge in developing countries. There is no one single approach to reforming forest tenure practices for achieving gender equality and women’s empowerment. Rather, it involves taking advantage of opportunities that emerge in various institutional arenas such as policy and law-making and implementation, government administration, customary or community-based tenure governance, or forest restoration at the landscape scale.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
February, 2019

In the last 40 years, large areas of the Mau forest, the largest contiguous tropical montane forest in East Africa, have been cleared for agriculture. To date, there are no empirical data on how this land use change affects carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes from soil respiration and soil methane (CH4) fluxes. This study reports measured annual soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes from the native Mau forest and previously forested lands converted to smallholder grazing land, smallholder and commercial tea plantations and eucalyptus plan- tations.

Library Resource

A Summary

Institutional & promotional materials
January, 2019
South America, Peru

The Government of Peru is gradually advancing in the process of recognizing and formalizing the territorial rights of the indigenous peoples of the Amazon. 
In order to document and analyse how titling is carried out and how the local population perceives its impacts, the Centre for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), with the support of German development cooperation, conducted a study on the progress and challenges of native community titling processes. this is the summary of the study conducted in the Ucayali and San Martin regions of the Peruvian Amazon. 

Library Resource
Institutional & promotional materials
January, 2019
South America, Peru

El Gobierno del Perú está avanzando poco a poco en el proceso de reconocimiento y formalización de los derechos territoriales de los pueblos indígenas de la Amazonía. 

Library Resource
Reports & Research
January, 2019
Global

Forest landscape restoration (FLR) requires a long-term commitment from a range of stakeholders to plan the restoration initiative collaboratively and see it through successfully. This is only possible when the people involved – whether they are landholders, indigenous groups, government entities, non-governmental organizations or other crucial actors – come together to define common goals and monitor progress toward those goals.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
December, 2018
Uganda, Africa, Eastern Africa

This study aims to explain effects of soil textural class, topography, land use, and land use history on soil greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes in the Lake Victoria region. We measured GHG fluxes from intact soil cores collected in Rakai, Uganda, an area characterized by low‐input smallholder (<2 ha) farming systems, typical for the East African highlands. The soil cores were air dried and rewetted to water holding capacities (WHCs) of 30, 55, and 80%. Soil CO2, CH4, and N2O fluxes were measured for 48 h following rewetting.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
December, 2018
Africa, Eastern Africa

Conversion of natural forest to other land uses could lead to significant changes in catchment hydrology, but the nature of these changes has been insufficiently investigated in tropical montane catchments, especially in Africa. To address this knowledge gap, we identified stream water sources and flow paths in three tropical montane sub-catchments (27–36 km2) with different land use (natural forest, smallholder agriculture and commercial tea plantations) within a 1 021 km2 catchment in the Mau Forest Complex, Kenya.

Library Resource
Policy Papers & Briefs
December, 2018
Global

In almost every country of the world, forest landscape restoration (FLR), which aims for the long-term conservation and sustainable use of forests, can help to reduce land-based emissions. In light of the fact that FLR remains heavily underutilized in practice, this brief elaborates concrete options for ambitious climate and forest protection through FLR that are not only effective and efficient, but also politically desirable and implementable.

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