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Displaying 37 - 48 of 469
Marriage or Inheritance: The Strange choice before daughters of Uttar Pradesh, India
18 October 2019
Authors: 
Shipra Deo
India

The daughters of Uttar Pradesh, the most populous state in India, face a vexing decision: Marriage or inheritance?

In 2006, when the state first recognized the rights of unmarried daughters to inherit family land, it simultaneously left millions of women with a dilemma. While ostensibly a step toward gender equality, the new law excluded married daughters, meaning that women who married would face the prospect of weakening or losing their rights to inherit land in their birth family. Daughters of the state were effectively left to choose between marriage and land ownership.

Ugandalandscape
4 October 2019
Authors: 
Lisette Mey
Stacey Zammit
William Kambugu
Uganda

Over the past few weeks, the Land Portal along with colleagues at Cadasta, have been hosting a three week online discussion (September 9-29) on the role of open land data in the fight against corruption.  With over 100 contributions to the discussion and a variety of different perspectives, ranging from civil society to government representatives, we have received some valuable and thought-provoking content.

WLR_LatinAmerica
1 October 2019
Authors: 
Mr. Justin Loveland
Latin America and the Caribbean

Land distribution is an issue innately tied to inequality throughout the region of Latin America and the Caribbean, which is considered the most unequal region in the world. This inequality ranges from wealth disparity and political corruption to gender discrimination in labor practices and the exploitation of natural resources.

Uganda
1 October 2019
Authors: 
Mr. David Bledsoe
Uganda

Over the past year, during my work in western Uganda, I have had the opportunity to get to know Paolyel Onencan. Paolyel is the Executive Director of Buliisa Initiative for Rural Development Organisation (BIRUDO). Paolyel and his BIRUDO colleagues are doing good work around Uganda’s oil and gas development in the Albertine Graben, by helping families get better deals on compensation from the oil companies (Total and China National Offshore Oil Company) working in the region.

Strengthening Land Rights Will Curb Migration
24 September 2019
Authors: 
Chris Jochnick
Central America
Mexico
United States of America

What the US faces on its southern border is not a security problem, but a humanitarian crisis, and punishing attempts at deterrence cannot resolve it. Enabling people to stay where they are requires, first and foremost, strengthening their right to be there.

23 September 2019
Authors: 
Solina Kennedy
Global

A conversation with Julie Maldonado, Associate Director at Livelihoods Knowledge Exchange Network (LiKEN), and Co-Director of Rising Voices: Climate Resilience through Indigenous and Earth Sciences.

This is the second interview in our Climate Crisis, Global Land Use, and Human Rights Interview Series. See the first here.

Realizing the 2030 Agenda: Tilting the Scales of Poverty in Favor of Vulnerable Communities Through Land Data
20 September 2019
Authors: 
Everlyne Nairesiae
Clinton Omosula
Mr. Neil Sorensen
Global

On 24 and 25 September 2019, Heads of State and Governments will gather at the United Nations Headquarters in New York for the summit Accelerating the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This is a crucial event for evaluating progress towards the 17 goals and 169 ambitious targets countries have set to eradicate poverty, achieve food security, empower women, secure the planet and foster peace and stability.

open data
17 September 2019
Authors: 
Stacey Zammit
Lisette Mey
Global

Our online discussion “Open Land Data in the Fight Against Corruption” is well underway with many interesting contributions so far. We are discussing whether Open Data can be a key tool to increase transparency, support innovation and increase civic engagement, in the fight against corruption. One of the key questions which reverberates throughout the open data debate in the land sector, however, is how much transparency is too much?

energy.jpg
6 September 2019
Authors: 
Solina Kennedy
Global

A conversation with Annie Signorelli, Project Manager for Renewable Energy and Human Rights at the Business and Human Rights Resource Centre

This is the first interview in the Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment's Climate Crisis, Global Land Use, and Human Rights Interview Series.

anniesignorelli

31 August 2019
Authors: 
Stacey Zammit
Global

Increasingly, governments and citizens in developing countries as well as development agencies are using information technology to improve governance, shape government-citizen relations, and reduce corruption. Despite this, we continue to be at the first phases of understanding how to best use these new data sources in anti-corruption work, as well as appreciating the challenges and limitations inherent in them.  

RegularizationBonito
27 August 2019
Authors: 
Mrs. Patricia Maria Queiroz Chaves
Brazil

For the first time, women from informal settlements in the Municipality of Bonito, State of Pernambuco, Brazil will be granted with land titles in which they have lived in for decades

Consent is Everybody’s Business: Why banks need to act on free, prior and informed consent
27 August 2019
Authors: 
Imke Greven
Africa
Latin America and the Caribbean
Asia
Global

Banks must stand with Indigenous and local communities in respecting their land rights

In 2018, every week more than three people were murdered, defending their land and environment from destructive industries like mining, logging and agribusiness. These killings represent the extreme end of a spectrum of violence and threats directed at land rights defenders.

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