Colombia related Blog post | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data
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17 October 2018
Authors: 
Mr. Malcolm Childress
Tanzania
Colombia
India
Global

Until today, the world had no internationally comparable data on citizens’ perceptions of the security their property rights; no way of tracking how people evaluated the likelihood of their home or other land being taken from them.

Maria in Brazil - Land Defender
7 September 2018
Authors: 
Ben Leather
Honduras
Mexico
Brazil
Colombia
Philippines

“It is up to me to follow in the same footsteps as my father walked, so that they’ll give us back our land again.” 

- Ramón Bedoya, Colombia

 

“The desire for justice and reparations for the fallen defenders, for their families, and above all that this never happens again—that is an energy that compels you to keep working.”

– Isela González, Mexico

 

“The owner of the plantation… should give back our land… It’s not just for our family but the rest of the people living in the area. My father offered his blood. He gave his life. We will continue.”

The Alliance of Indigenous Peoples of the Archipelago (AMAN)
7 September 2018
Authors: 
Andrew Anderson
Guatemala
Honduras
Mexico
Brazil
Colombia
Philippines
Global

FRONT LINE DEFENDERS has documented 821 human rights defenders (HRDs) who have been killed in the four years since we started producing an annual global list in cooperation with national and international NGOs. Seventy-nine percent of this total came from six countries: Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, and the Philippines. The vast majority of these cases have never been properly investigated, and few of the perpetrators of the killings have been brought to justice.

Colombia

By Stephanie Burgos, Oxfam America, Government Affairs Associate Director for Latin America, Land Rights and Trade

Colombia has the most unequal distribution of land in Latin America, yet equitable access to land is a decisive factor for consolidating peace in Colombia.

Global
Africa
Kenya
Uganda
Latin America and the Caribbean
Colombia
Peru
Asia
Indonesia
Nepal

The recent World Bank Conference on Land and Poverty, held this past March in Washington D.C., provided a unique opportunity to reflect on collective land tenure reforms not only from a research point of view, but also from that of governments.

Traditionally, small ‘Pygmy’ communities moved frequently through forest territories, gathering a vast range of forest products, collecting and exchanging goods with neighboring settled societies. © Selcen Kucukustel/Atlas
Global
Brazil
Colombia
Malaysia
India

By  Lewis Evans, Survival International

For Earth Day (April 22), Survival International reveals some of the amazing ways in which tribal peoples are the best conservationists and guardians of the natural world:

1. The Baka “Pygmies” have over 15 words for elephant

The Baka people know so much about elephants, they have different words for them according to their sex, age and even temperament.

(Photo: AlCortés / Flickr)
Colombia

Colombia’s peaceful future hinges greatly on how the country deals with one issue: land.

When indigenous peoples have access and rights to their lands, nature and people are better off Image: REUTERS/Roosevelt Cassio
Bolivia
Brazil
Colombia
Global

By Gina Cosentino, Social Development Specialist, World Bank and Climate Investment Funds

Everything old is new again, at least when it comes to searching for workable and proven solutions to addressing climate change. Indigenous peoples have developed, over time, innovative climate-smart practices rooted in traditional knowledge and their relationship with nature.

puerto lopez, meta, colombia, land titles, land rights, property issues, conflict, usaid, usaid transforms
16 April 2019
Authors: 
Mr. Nicholas Parkinson
Colombia
In Colombia, the region of Meta is streamlining resources to support land formalization activities through municipal land offices and improving lives by doing so.

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