Protocol on the implementation of the Alpine Convention of 1991 in the field of soil conservation. | Land Portal
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This Protocol has been adopted by the Contracting Parties to implement the Alpine Convention as regards soil conservation. The Protocol takes into account the functions of the Alpine soil as a natural resource, as an archive of natural history, as a location for agricultural use including pasture farming and forestry and as a source of raw materials. The measures to be taken are aimed specifically at soil utilization which suits its location, at the economical use of land resources, at the avoidance of erosion and detrimental changes to the soil structure and at minimizing the input of substances harmful to the soil. The Protocol aims in particular at preserving the diversity of soils, which is typical of the Alpine region. Soils worthy of protection shall be included in the designation of protected areas. The extraction of mineral resources shall be based upon the principle of prevention and prudent use of soil.

Implements: Convention on the protection of the Alps (Alpine Convention) and Annexes, Salzburg 7 November 1991. (1991-10-14)

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