The Tenure Facility | Page 2 | Land Portal
The Tenure Facility

Location

Franzéngatan 1B, 6th floor
112 51 Stockholm
Sweden
SE
Working languages: 
English

The International Land and Forest Tenure Facility is focused on securing land and forest rights for Indigenous Peoples and local communities. We are the first financial mechanism to exclusively fund projects working towards this goal while reducing conflict, driving development, improving global human rights, and mitigating the impacts of climate change. We provide funding at scale directly to communities and their partners; build relationships with key actors within government and the private sector, and provide the technical expertise required to implement tenure rights within existing laws and policy.

The Tenure Facility Resources

Displaying 6 - 9 of 9
Library Resource
COVID-19, Regulatory Rollback and the ‘Green Recovery’: Indigenous Peoples Raise Their Voices

A Webinar Report

Reports & Research
October, 2020
Global

COVID-19 has negatively affected indigenous land rights, particularly for those who already face food insecurity as a result of land confiscation or grabbing and the loss of their territories. Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, the expropriation of indigenous lands and natural resources and the increase in conflicts on their territories were already placing indigenous peoples in a particularly precarious situation. The crisis has led to reports of encroachment upon indigenous land by opportunists, such as illegal loggers and miners.

Library Resource
COVID-19, Biodiversity and Climate Change: Indigenous Peoples Defining the Path Forward

Webinar Report

Reports & Research
October, 2020
Global

Indigenous Peoples and local communities manage more than half of the world´s land. These biodiverse ancestral lands are vital to the people who steward them and the planet we all share. But governments only recognize indigenous and community legal ownership of 10 percent of the world´s lands. Secure tenure is essential for safeguarding the existing forests against external forces. This is specifically true for forests managed by Indigenous Peoples, where much of the world’s carbon is stored.

Library Resource
COVID-19 and Public Health: Indigenous Peoples on the Front Line
Reports & Research
October, 2020
Global

Three-quarters of emerging infectious diseases are zoonoses, meaning they can be transmitted from animals to humans, with Ebola, SARS, MERS and now COVID-19 being examples. Scientists are warning that deforestation, industrial agriculture, illegal wildlife trade, climate change and other types of environmental degradation increase the risk of future pandemics.

Share this page