indigenous peoples related Blog post | Land Portal
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indigenous peoples

Synonyms: 
indigenous communities
indigenous community

People whose ancestors inhabited a place or a country when persons from another culture or ethnic background arrived on the scene and dominated them through conquest, settlement, or other means and who today live more in conformity with their own social, economic, and cultural customs and traditions than those of the country of which they now form a part.

 

Source: Convention (No. 169) concerning Indigenous and Tribal Peoples in Independent Countries, UNHCHR, 1991.

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Displaying 1 - 12 of 57
30 September 2020
Authors: 
Joshua Lichtenstein
Central America
Panama
South America

4 August 2020
Authors: 
Ms. Karol Boudreaux
Global

Supporting women’s ability to own, manage and control land will help accelerate gender equality globally

It is depressing, discouraging, infuriating – pick your word – to see the scale and scope of abuse and discrimination aimed at women and girls worldwide.

4 August 2020
Authors: 
Omaira Bolanos
Latin America and the Caribbean

Many Latin American countries recognize the property rights of indigenous and Afro-descendant people, but those laws do little to protect women’s access to land

Latin America’s indigenous and Afro-descendant communities are facing not just one pandemic, but three. Women bear the brunt of them all, which threatens communities’ very survival.

28 May 2020
Authors: 
Prof. Tomaso Ferrando
Prof. Marcela Vecchione-Gonçalves
Latin America and the Caribbean
Brazil

Law Project 2.633/2020 is presented to the Brazilian Congress and may sign a point of no-return in the struggle for the Amazon and its socio-biodiversity

How Anna Letaiko got her land
30 April 2020
Authors: 
Ezekiel Kereri
Tanzania

Anna Letaiko is a middle-aged woman with a soft voice that carries wisdom and strength. Her husband is an older man, and together they live in small mud house in Mundarara – a remote village in Longido district in Tanzania, accessible only by a rough dirt road. It is a Maasai community similar to the one in which I grew up, except that the community’s livelihood is based on mining and pastoralism while my community still depends on farming and pastoralism.

I met Anna through my work with WOLTS – a five-year action research project on women’s land rights in pastoral communities that are affected by mining. As a speaker of the Maasai language, my job is to facilitate and translate in training sessions and help develop training materials.

In Maasai culture, it is very rare for women to own land. Men see themselves as owning land on behalf of the whole family. If women do apply for land, they usually apply in the name of their husband or son. 

However, the law in Tanzania (Land Act, 1999, and Village Land Act, 1999) grants women and men the same rights to land access, ownership and control. The law also says that women have the same rights in decision-making over land. What Maasai customs mean in practice is that women are denied the right to apply for land and own it themselves. 

During our research we heard that, when women in Mundarara applied for land in their own names, their applications were ignored, not taken seriously, and even thrown away. Some women were even asked for sex in exchange for land documents.

Our aim through the WOLTS project is to support the community to find their own solutions to land rights problems. To help them achieve this, we asked them to select community ‘champions’ who would be trained in land rights, mining laws, investment laws, mineral valuation and legal procedures for licence applications, as well as gender-based violence. 

Anna was one of the first champions to be trained in Mundarara. When we first started working in the community, Anna did not even know that she had the right to own land.  After the WOLTS training sessions, she put in an application, and it was taken seriously. 

A few months later, Anna received a small plot near the village centre where she wants to build a modern house. As a trained champion for gender equity, she has promised to help other women by raising awareness and assisting them to become land owners like herself.

The growth of artisanal mining in Mundarara has brought many changes to the community, including giving families new sources of income. Women are finding that they have more opportunities to earn money and participate in community and family decision-making, including through land ownership. 

Documenting and sharing Anna Letaiko’s story reminded me how quickly life is changing in pastoral districts due to factors like mining. I hope it will inspire readers, raise the voices of less fortunate groups, and improve everyday life in communities similar to my own.

 

womancistern
4 December 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Priti Darooka
Global

Author: Priti Darooka [1] with contributions by Farida Akhter 

I want to thank IWRAW Asia Pacific for organising a two day strategic dialogue on Women Human Rights and Climate Justice. Some of the points shared here are points discussed at this dialogue in Bangkok in November 2019. 

I also want to thank contributions by Feminist Land Platform members, especially Farida Akhter of Bangladesh. 

energy.jpg
6 September 2019
Authors: 
Solina Kennedy
Global

A conversation with Annie Signorelli, Project Manager for Renewable Energy and Human Rights at the Business and Human Rights Resource Centre

This is the first interview in the Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment's Climate Crisis, Global Land Use, and Human Rights Interview Series.

anniesignorelli

Consent is Everybody’s Business: Why banks need to act on free, prior and informed consent
27 August 2019
Authors: 
Imke Greven
Africa
Latin America and the Caribbean
Asia
Global

Banks must stand with Indigenous and local communities in respecting their land rights

In 2018, every week more than three people were murdered, defending their land and environment from destructive industries like mining, logging and agribusiness. These killings represent the extreme end of a spectrum of violence and threats directed at land rights defenders.

WomenDeliver2019_RRI
12 July 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Lindsay Bigda
Tanzania
Mexico
Global

Indigenous and local community women play crucial roles as household and forest managers, food providers, and leaders of rural enterprises—and make invaluable contributions toward global sustainable development and climate goals. The evidence is clear that securing their rights to community lands offers a promising path toward prosperity and sustainability in the forested and rural areas of the world. Yet these rights remain constrained by unjust laws and practices, and the voices of these women are consistently underrepresented in decision-making processes at all levels.

Landscape_Madagascar_01_0.jpg
27 June 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Gabrielle Lipton
Global

In the climate and development arenas, the most current alarm being sounded is for rights –securing the land rights and freedoms of Indigenous peoples, local communities and the marginalized members therein. How can these custodians of a quarter of the world’s terrestrial surface be expected to care for their traditional lands if the lands don’t, in fact, belong to them? Or, worse, if they’re criminalized and endangered for doing so?

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Our Mission

The Amazon Conservation Team partners with indigenous and other local communities to protect tropical forests and strengthen traditional culture.


Our Vision

We see a future where healthy tropical forests and thriving local communities exist in harmonious relationship with each other, contributing to the well-being of the planet.

The Amerindian Peoples Association (APA) is a non-governmental Indigenous Peoples organisation in Guyana. It is primarily an advocacy organisation that seeks to promote and defend the rights of the Indigenous Peoples of Guyana. 

Membership of the APA is made up of Units throughout the country, currently amounting to close to eighty such units. The Association is led by an Executive Committee comprising the President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, Assistant Secretary/Treasurer, thirteen regional representatives, a women’s representative and a youth representative. 

Anuario Antropologico

Anuário Antropológico (Anuário Antropológico)

Anuário Antropológico é uma revista semestral do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Antropologia Social da Universidade de Brasília (PPGAS/UnB). Publica artigos originais, ensaios bibliográficos, resenhas, críticas e outros textos de natureza acadêmica que apresentem pesquisas empíricas de qualidade, diálogos teóricos relevantes e perspectivas analíticas diversas. A Revista publica textos em português, inglês, espanhol ou francês.Os artigos selecionados pela comissão editorial são submetidos a pareceristas externos em regime de anonimato.

A Articulação dos Povos Indígenas do Brasil – APIB é uma instância de aglutinação e referência nacional do movimento indígena no Brasil, que nasceu com o propósito de:

– fortalecer a união dos povos indígenas, a articulação entre as diferentes regiões e organizações indígenas do país;
– unificar as lutas dos povos indígenas, a pauta de reivindicações e demandas e a política do movimento indígena;
– mobilizar os povos e organizações indígenas do país contra as ameaças e agressões aos direitos indígenas.

The Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) is a regional organization founded in 1988 by indigenous peoples' movements. AIPP is committed to the cause of promoting and defending indigenous peoples' rights and human rights and articulating issues of relevance to indigenous peoples. At present, AIPP has 47 members from 14 countries in Asia with 14 National Formations, 15 Sub-national Formations and 18 Local Formations. Of this number, 6 are Indigenous Women's Organizations and 4 are Indigenous Youth Organizations.

Both Ends

Together with environmental justice and human rights groups from poor and developing countries, Both ENDS works towards a sustainable, fair and inclusive world.

The vision of Both ENDS is a world where long-term environmental sustainability and social equity take priority over short-term profits.

Martinus Nijhoff Publishers was an independent academic publishing company dating back to the nineteenth century, which is now an imprint of Brill Publishers. Founded in 1683, Brill is a publishing house with a rich history and a strong international focus. The name was changed to Brill–Nijhoff. Brill is a prestigious imprint with its portfolio focuses on areas in Public International Law, Human Rights, Humanitarian Law and increasingly on International Relations. Brill publishes over 800 books per year in both print and electronic format.

BHRRC

We are 13 trustees and 58 staff dedicated to advancing human rights in business and eradicating abuse.  Our 18 Regional Researchers are based in Australia, Brazil, China, Colombia, Germany, India, Kenya, Jordan, Mexico, Myanmar, Philippines, Senegal, South Africa, Tunisia, UK, Ukraine, and the USA. They are supported by our two offices in London and New York. Oversight is provided by our board of trustees which consists of former business people, human rights, development, and environmental advocates and academics.

 

Mission et Objectifs

Le CED s’est donné pour mission de contribuer à la protection des droits, des intérêts, de la culture et les aspirations des communautés locales et autochtones des forêts d’Afrique Centrale, par la promotion de la justice environnementale et de la gestion durable des ressources naturelles dans la région.

Nos objectifs sont les suivants:

cclaf
O Centro de Cultura Luiz Freire (CCLF) é uma organização não governamental de direitos humanos, que surge em 1972, a partir de um grupo que buscava a restauração da democracia, através de atividades culturais e projetos de desenvolvimento comunitário, durante o período autoritário da Ditadura Militar brasileira.

The Centre for the Indigenous Peoples’ Autonomy and Development (CADPI) is a social organisation dedicated to research and studying of issues related with the indigenous peoples in Nicaragua, regional in Central America and Latin America and on a global level.

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